Table of Contents > Herbs & Supplements > Kamut® (Triticum turanicum, Triticum turgidum subsp. turanicum) Print

Kamut® (Triticum turanicum, Triticum turgidum subsp. turanicum)

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Also listed as: Triticum turanicum, Triticum turgidum subsp. turanicum, Khorasan wheat
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Giant wheat, Green Kamut®, Kamut grain, Khorasan wheat, King Tut's wheat, QK-77, sweet wheat, T. turgidum subsp. turanicum, Triticum turanicum.

Background
  • QK-77 is a type of wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. turanicum) marketed by Kamut International USA and Kamut Enterprises of Europe under the trademark Kamut®. Kamut® is a high-protein grain, similar to durum wheat. The grains are 2-3 times the size of common wheat, contain 20-40% more protein, and are higher in lipids, amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. Kamut® is not to be confused with different varieties of wheat, such as Polish wheat or farro.
  • Kamut® is available as whole grain, flour, and bulgur and may also be found in various specialty products, including cereals, breads, cakes, biscuits, pasta, and frozen meals. It is promoted as being suitable for those with wheat intolerance and also as a more nutritious alternative to wheat.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Food allergies, nutrition.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in patients prone to allergic reactions to wheat. The allergenic potential of Kamut® has been reported. Patients who are wheat sensitive may also be intolerant to Kamut® grain.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Kamut® is a grain found in various foods available for consumption and is likely safe in pregnant or breastfeeding women when consumed in normal dietary amounts, in nonallergic individuals. There is insufficient reliable information available about the safety of higher levels.
  • Kamut® may cause abdominal cramps, fatigue, headaches, hives, itching, pain, and spasms.
  • Avoid in wheat-sensitive individuals, particularly those with severe wheat allergy, or in individuals with gluten intolerance.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Kamut® is a grain found in various foods available for consumption and is likely safe when consumed in normal dietary amounts, in nonallergic individuals. There is insufficient reliable information available about the safety of higher levels.
  • Information on the effect of Kamut® on lactation is currently lacking in the National Institute of Health's Lactation and Toxicology Database (LactMed).

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Abdel-Aal el, Young JC, Rabalski I, et al. Identification and quantification of seed carotenoids in selected wheat species. J Agric Food Chem 2007;55(3):787-794.
  2. Rozan P, Kuo YH, Lambein F. Free amino acids present in commercially available seedlings sold for human consumption. A potential hazard for consumers. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48(3):716-723.
  3. Simonato B, Pasini G, Giannattasio M, et al. Allergenic potential of Kamut wheat. Allergy 2002;57(7):653-654.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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